Archive for the ‘Humanitarian work’ Category

As all of you read in my last post, She went to Tunisia. I found another article about her visit with more information! here it is, hope you like it!

Angelina Jolie paid a visit to Tunisia this week. Unfortunately, this sparked some unrest near the Libyan border, where a crowd of refugees wreaked havoc.

“The people were beyond excited to see her,” says a witness, until it went awry.

There were thousands of refugees screaming her name and chanting. The crowd was closing in on her and her security detail; it was intense.”

For safety reasons, the actress and United Nations Goodwill Ambassador was forced to cancel half her visit, which included plans to visit a Moroccan hospital.

Before the commotion, she spoke with refugees who fled the fighting in Libya. Tunisia has received more than half of the outflow from the war-torn country.

Despite the upset, Jolie didn’t lose sight of her mission.

“The international community has done well to reinforce Tunisia’s remarkable relief effort,” she said in a statement excerpted by the UN official website.

“But with 2,500 people still crossing each day, we cannot let the funding dry up and we need to sustain the momentum,” Angelina Jolie said.

Here you can see a video of her in Tunisia: http://www.tmz.com/videos?autoplay=true&mediaKey=43ac04ff-82bb-4ca1-b485-208f336e4bd7

As we can see in many pictures she was surrounded of many pepole that were expecting her and she was really kind with all the refugees (we can also see it in the video).

This event has shown up also in the spanish press (El Mundo) and even in twitter:

here is the link for other video much better than the other one: http://www.unmultimedia.org/tv/unifeed/d/17369.html?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

The goodwill ambassador for UNHCR, the American actress Angelina Jolie has visited a refugee camp on the border between Libya and Tunisia,  to see the situation of those displaced by the military conflict in Libya.

More than 400,000 people have fled in the direction of Libya, Tunisia and Egypt since violent riots broke out in the country in mid-February. The actress, girlfriend of Brad Pitt, is one of the most committed of Hollywood as evidenced by its accreditation goodwill ambassador for UNHCR.

Jolie also praised the “outpouring of generosity” shown by the Tunisians, fresh from its own revolution, to accommodate about half of the more than 400,000 people have fled to neighboring Libya.

“But there are still about 2,000 people each day cross the border from Libya to Tunisia, so we must not exhaust the financial means to evacuate and repatriate refugees,” said the ambassador of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees in the town of Ras Adjir.

Therefore, during her visit, the actress gave an important contribution of the Jolie-Pitt Foundation to continue with humanitarian evacuations. The Foundation has taken over the cost of a return flight to their country of origin for 177 persons and the purchase of an ambulance to support the care offered to the injured who come to Tunisia from Libya.

Most people who come running from Libya are migrant workers, but also some from countries in conflict, unable to return, and therefore require international protection.

“They wait here with little hope, unable to return to their country of origin and not knowing what will become of them. This constant cycle of displacement must stop,” said Jolie.

After hearing the stories of some of the fugitives from Libya, actress appealed for the UN and NGOs have access to that country and to provide urgent humanitarian assistance, particularly food and medicines.

It also heard testimony from some sub-Saharan nationals in Libya were deliberately targeted to be confused with mercenaries in the service of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, and called for opening a humanitarian corridor to allow those people access to places where they can hide. He recalled that no humanitarian corridor that thousands of sub-Saharan Africans are no other recourse but to jump into the sea aboard unstable vessels to reach the Italian island of Lampedusa, and in some cases die during the dangerous crossing.

Taken from: http://www.heraldodesoria.es/index.php/mod.noticias/mem.detalle/idnoticia.71580/relcategoria.104

Angelina Jolie is escorted through a security checkpoint as she catches a departing flight out of LAX airport in Los Angeles on Sunday afternoon (April 3).

The 35-year-old humanitarian and actress reportedly caught a flight to the Middle East for another United Nations mission. Angie has been a dedicated ambassador for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), a UN agency that currently assists 20 million refugees in approximately 120 countries.

Found this article from a few days ago that speaks of Angelina’s concern about Libyan refugees. Hope you like it.

Angelina Jolie has urged officials around the world to “protect” Libyans as they attempt to flee the nation under the reign of controversial leader Muammar Gaddafi.

Colonel Gaddafi has vowed to “fight to the death” amid the uprising sweeping the African nation, insisting he’s willing to “die as a martyr” rather than relinquish power.

As a result, an estimated 100,000 people are attempting to enter neighbouring countries, and Jolie – a goodwill ambassador for the United Nations’ high commissioner for refugees – is calling on authorities to “address” the crisis.

In a statement, she says, “It is critical that all parties respect the fundamental right of people in danger to flee to safety – whether civilians caught in conflict in their own country or refugees and asylum seekers caught in new conflicts. All I’m asking is that civilians be protected and not targeted or harmed.

“The world needs to address this moment. We have to give people safe passage, evacuation if needed, and ensure they have asylum. We don’t want to look back and find their deaths are on our hands.”

(http://www.contactmusic.com/news.nsf/story/angelina-jolie-calls-for-world-leaders-to-protect-libyan-refugees_1205086)

Here I post you this article, I think it’s pretty interesting, hope you enjoy it!

She plays many roles onscreen, but Angelina Jolie never loses sight of her important role as a concerned global citizen and active UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador. The dedication to her craft that garnered Angelina an Academy Award for her performance in Girl, Interrupted (1999), is reflected in her efforts for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), a UN agency that currently assists 20 million refugees in approximately 120 countries.

Angelina’s involvement with UNHCR began with a mission to Sierra Leone, a small African country that – like the Democratic Republic of the Congo – has been devastated by years of brutal civil war. Seeing firsthand the enormous challenges that refugees face was a life-altering experience for Angelina, who decided to use her fame to aid their cause. In 2001, she was named a UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador.

Although only 28, Angelina’s acting career has already spanned two decades. Her first feature role was in Lookin’ to Get Out (1982), a film co-written and co-produced by her father, the acclaimed actor Jon Voight. Since then, she has received Golden Globe Awards for the television movies George Wallace (1997) and Gia (1998) and her film credits include Hackers (1995), The Bone Collector (1999), Gone in Sixty Seconds (2000), Lara Croft: Tomb Raider (2001), and Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life (2003).

 

 

As a UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador, Angelina uses her status as a superstar to generate media coverage about the plight of refugees and the conditions under which they live. She has traveled widely to remote refugee camps and receiving centers in countries including Tanzania, Namibia, Cambodia, Pakistan, Thailand, and Ecuador. To further raise awareness, she has released her personal journals for select field visits that can be accessed at USA for UNHCR. For her efforts, Angelina has been honored with the Church World Service Immigration and Refugee Program Humanitarian Award.

While hosting What’s Going On? Angelina was inspired by the stories of the Fataki brothers, Echa Nyange and Sofia Mocke, all children living at the Lugufu refugee camp in Tanzania.

Tragically, their stories are all too familiar to Angelina, who has met thousands of men, women, and children forced to flee from their homes and struggle to survive as refugees. “You go to these places and you realize what life’s really about and what people are really going through,” says Angelina. “These people are my heroes.”

P.S: web URL: http://www.un.org/works/goingon/refugees/angelina_story.html

Here I post you a video of an interview long time ago:

Angelina Jolie recently tavelled to Afghanistan to visit with war refugees. Jolie is an official goodwill ambassador for the UNHCR, the United Nations High Commissioner For Refugees.

After taking stock of the current conditions of refugees in Afghanistan, Jolie said in an official statement from the UNHCR, “The focus needs to be put now on reintegration and that means not just putting up shelter but making sure there is water, job opportunities, a school for the children and medical clinics.”

This was Jolie’s second trip visiting refugees in Afghanistan.The Academy Award-winning actress and mother of six visited families she had met in 2008. One stop was at a former storage warehouse that is now housing internally displaced or returned refugees. It’s a place that should be a temporary home at most.

Jolie visited Khanum Gul and her husband, who live in a small damp room with eight children. A United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) tarpaulin covers a hole in the front wall to keep out the wind and snow.

Khanum had just had her son Samir when she met Jolie in 2008. The child is now two, and Jolie said, “It was very distressing to see that, because of the poor conditions, Samir seems to be suffering some form of developmental delay due to malnutrition or lack of medical care. He can’t walk and is barely surviving.”

Jolie’s visit saw glimmers of hope in Qala Gadu, the village where she is supporting the building of a school.

The United Nations Refugee Agency reported that Qala Gadu was the “scene of fierce fighting during successive waves of conflict in Afghanistan since the late 1970s. Among the 2,500 families in the area, almost everyone is a returned refugee or was internally displaced before 2002.”

The actress activist met students who will attend the primary school after it is built. A little girl named Sahira told the actress, “If you build this school, I promise I will work really hard and study until the 12th grade.” The 10-year-old is the youngest of five daughters and the first to attend school.